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Getting a closer look…

Our gas giant of a neighbor, Jupiter, has always possessed mysteries that had the worlds scientists pondering for decades. The most pondering mystery is that of Jupiter’s iconic Giant Red Spot. A gigantic storm capable of fitting three Earths end to end within itself. NASA’s Juno probe has made a historic close flyby of the spot, recording and beaming back as much data it can grab. In time, it will give new insight on one of the most noted storm in our solar system.

Franklin would be proud…

As the research and growth of renewable energy grows, a potential energy source has blown in. Kite power, using industrial strength kites to harness the power of high winds. The system runs with twin kits, as they are pulled out by the high winds, they windup an electrical generator. Such a system can be setup in urban city centers, open plains, coastal seas, and disaster relief areas. Still in an experimental stage its interesting avenue for renewable energy.

Largest found so far…

Researchers from the Dublin Institute have released what may be the most detailed picture of a star other than our own. And it’s no normal star, a giant of giants, a star named Betelgeuse (Beetlejuice) is some 1400 times larger than our own sun. Large enough that it would touch Jupiter if it was where our Sun is. This giant of a star is acting quite peculiar and has been giving much needed answers on the building blocks of stars.

Learning from mistakes…

The good fight against Cancer is never ending and can lead to unexpected roads. A team of researchers found to what would be the “Achilles heel” of cancer. They believed by removing this function of cancer cells, it would greatly hinder their growth and development. But the exact opposite happened, the cells grew in greater numbers. It may be considered a failure, but it opened new information and avenues for continued research. When it comes to science, failure is always an option.

So high a score it resets…

You can’t beat the Classics, Frogger, Space Invaders, Ms. Pac-Man, and for the longest time neither could AI made by Google or Microsoft. To play and to react to a game as a human can, are great testbeds for advancing AI research. For the longest time Ms. Pac-Man was a game that couldn’t be beat by an AI. But a team at Microsoft managed the feat after some hefty programing. It’s interesting to see how the AI views the game, it’s a lot more patient then our scrambling away from the ghosts.

The Evil Twin is still out there…

Seemingly out of a day-time soap opera, our Sun at one point had a twin sibling, ironically named Nemesis. Researchers from Berkeley and Harvard University have found that stars similar to our own Sun, are born as twins. Their research finds that there is a fifty-fifty chance that the twins split or stick together as they develop. To think how our solar system would look with a second sun as far out as Neptune.

Building the family…

The heavyweight champion of our Solar System, Jupiter, just grew a bit larger and heavier. It holds the heavyweight title for not only size but the number of Moons it has. Last count was a total of 67 moons. Astronomers just increased that as they found that Jupiter just gained two more. This gravity powerhouse of a planet steals asteroids and meteors as they fly by, making them permanent members of his personal system.

On Mars with style…

With more people looking toward the stars and thinking of ways of getting off the planet, we forget one question, how will we travel around that new planet? One company took on the challenge. Using set levels and parameters they designed a rover that appears to be a cross between a tank and the Batmobile. An interesting design none the less and can get one wondering how the first colony on Mars will look like.

Greener than green…

Photosynthesis, the base life function of all plants on Earth, has long eluded replication by scientists. This process turns the Sun’s energy into usable energy for the many plants of Earth. Thanks to researchers from Brookhaven National Laboratory, we may be close to replicating the process. If successfully done it can help produce new green fuels in great and cheaper quantities that we can currently.

The Water of Life…

Thanks to the never-ending work of Nasa researchers we continue to reveal the hidden history of our neighbor, Mars. It has long been known that at one point or another, Mars had water. Where water is, there is life. And through processes still being studied, Mars lost its water. Recent discoveries from Curiosity have shown that Mars had water for a lot longer than previous estimates. Given this new timeframe gives new hope of finding ancient life on Mars.